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Just When You Think It Can’t Get Worse: Tractor-Trailer Crash Fires…And How Truckers Are Supposed to Prevent Them

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Big-rig truck crashes are bad. As if it couldn’t get worse, sometimes trucks burst into flames. It’s like a scene from a Terminator movie. But it’s not. People really get hurt—or worse. Property really gets destroyed. Lives are changed forever.

Semi-truck fires happen. We’ll tell you common reasons why.

They shouldn’t. We’ll tell you why.

Common Causes Of Tractor-Trailer Fires

All South Carolina truckers must be familiar with our state’s Commercial Driver’s License Manual. This useful and informative book lists common causes of big-rig fires, so truckers know what to guard against:

  • After wrecks. Spilled fuel or the improper use of flares can ignite flames after a collision occurs.
  • Tires. Deflated tires and side–by–side tires that touch create friction to generate a flame.
  • Short circuits. Damaged insulation or loose connections can start a fearsome electrical fire.
  • Fueling. Horrific eruptions result from improper fueling, loose fuel connections, and—no, I’m not kidding—truckers smoking during the refueling process.
  • Cargo. Not just flammable cargo, but improperly sealed or loaded cargo or poor trailer ventilation can spark a fire.

Much of this can be prevented with simple steps truckers also know.

Simple Ways to Prevent 18-Wheeler Fires

The same manual instructs truckers to obey these steps to prevent fires:

  • Pre-trip inspection. We’ve written how vital these are. This is just one reason: it involves a complete evaluation of electrical, fuel, tires, and cargo systems, plus making sure the fire extinguisher is ready.
  • On-trip inspection. When truckers stop, they should check tires and the truck itself for signs of heat.
  • Safety precautions. Not just fueling, but braking, using flares, and anything else that could start a fire.
  • Checking engine gauges. These are designed to show signs of overheating. Truckers should also use side mirrors to look for smoke from tires or the trailer.

Don’t Get Burned Twice

If you’re the victim of a tractor-trailer crash with a fire, the last thing you need is to deal with the overwhelming details afterward. That includes making sure evidence doesn’t disappear, plus dealing with the trucker’s insurance company, all while you try to overcome grievous injuries or the tragic loss of a loved one. You need a lawyer who knows how to protect your rights and preserve your ability to maximize your financial recovery, so you can focus on your medical recovery. Together we can help you recover the best you can from the ash heap of this crash to build a brighter future. Call us now at (888) 230-1841 or (864) 582-0416 for a free meeting so we can discuss what we can do to help today.

If you have more questions about how crash cases work, be sure to check out our free report, which includes a chapter on 18-wheeler crashes.

 

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